Grab Your Carrot by the Horns

modgarden can you see your food

Have you ever eaten something you've grown yourself? Maybe some mint or basil in your kitchen window or a few tomato plants in your backyard? Well, congratulations -- you are a farmer!  For many of us the word "farm" conjures images of bales of hay, rows of crops and ... 'the combine' (ok, maybe not the last one, but it's reality).   



Have you ever eaten something you've grown yourself?

Maybe some mint or basil in your kitchen window or a few tomato plants in your backyard? Well, congratulations -- you are a farmer!  For many of us the word "farm" conjures images of bales of hay, rows of crops and ... 'the combine' (ok, maybe not the last one, but it's reality).   

At its roots (pun intended!), farming actually happens in many forms.  You can find farms in the most unexpected places. And farmers - we are all going to farm one day, but not in meadows of rolling hills, but in the comfort of your apartment (where no combines will ever fit).

It’s an interesting way of thinking about farming, isn’t it?  When humans first established the practice of agriculture, it marked an enormous shift from the nomadic traditions of hunting and gathering that preceded it. Suddenly, tribes had the ability to remain in one place and create homes, then villages and towns.  As these centers of population began to grow, the demand for food also grew. All these people in that time, and for centuries after this, had a clear notion - maybe even line of sight - of where their food came from.  

We citizens of Earth over the last century are seeing ourselves more and more distant from where our food originates.

In wealthy countries as recently as 200 years ago, 40-60% of the population worked as farmers. In 2012, this number had decreased to approximately 5%, meaning that approximately 95% of us have no connection to the origins of our day-to-day sustenance.

Ask yourself this question--do you know how your food is grown? Do you know if it has been exposed to chemicals or additives? Is it grown locally, in the same state, or even in the same country? For many of us, these questions are a mystery.

Relying on commercial farms and commercial grocery stores to get our food is not our only option. The opportunity to get involved in your own food production is getting easier and easier.  

Being your own farmer, a Tiny Farmer, is easy. The benefits of starting your own food production are numerous… here’s a brief breakdown for you:

A Commercial Farmer...

A Tiny Farmer...

Relies on mother nature to provide water and sunshine

Already lives in a ready-made greenhouse

Needs to apprentice on a farm for at least a few years before starting their own farm

Can start anytime using Modgarden's simple in-home system

Works around the clock

To say being a Tiny Farmer is a part-time job would be an overstatement

Needs to either purchase or lease a significant portion of land

Can start with their own apartment or home

Must invest in expensive equipment and storage

May use their playful hands, bright eyes, a discerning nose (and a helpful phone app) to get the job done

Will invariably make a few mistakes as they are learning—and lose crops and customers as a result

Can rely on a phone application for helpful instructions every day. Even a few mistakes here or there won’t cost much

Gets up at the crack of dawn to get to work on the tasks of the day

Gets up whenever they want—no want-ads for a pet rooster required

 

Without a doubt, full-time commercial farmers are incredibly dedicated and don’t nearly receive the appreciation or recognition they deserve for keeping enormous grocery stores well-stocked in our communities. However, there is a lot missing from the standard agricultural system today (...and, raising a topic for a later date:  There's a lot added in the form of hormones, pesticides and GMO).  Today, we lack the knowledge and assurance of how our food is grown.  By taking the opportunity to grow your own food, you can discover how easy and fulfilling it is to take control of your own sustenance, you nutrition and your health.

We think that’s something worth celebrating--over a homegrown salad, of course :)

February 06, 2017

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